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UNC Business & Administration

Complete coverage of North Carolina Business & Administration.

UNC-Chapel Hill celebrates second consecutive record fundraising year

UNC today announced $495 million in commitments in fiscal year 2016, marking the school’s best fundraising year in history and eclipsing fiscal year 2015’s previous record by nearly $50 million. “Today’s results – the highest level of fundraising support in the University’s 222-year history – is a proud moment for Carolina,” said Chancellor Carol L. Folt. (UNC.edu)

Chansky’s Notebook: No Food Projectiles, Please

Now that North Carolina has responded to the amended Notice of Allegations and Lew Margolis has told us that the Tar Heels should forfeit every victory back to the Choo Choo Justice era, Bubba’s staff has been working on some more really important stuff this summer hoping to increase attendance or concession revenue. Not sure which. (Chapelboro.com)

Judge drops NCAA from lawsuit filed by ex-UNC athletes

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit seeking to hold the NCAA partly responsible for UNC's academic scandal. U.S. District Court Judge Loretta C. Biggs stated attorneys for former women's basketball player Rashanda McCants and ex-football player Devon Ramsay hadn't proven that the NCAA had a legal obligation to ensure the soundness of classes at UNC. (Associated Press)

UNC owes nothing in NCAA response

Now that it’s clear that the NCAA has no power to intervene in UNC’s academic failures, calls for UNC to “do the right thing” by pulling down banners or hamstringing their own athletic programs will surely start to roll in. While this nuanced ending robs us of the tidy closure that we all deserved after sitting through years of this mess, nothing is owed to anyone in UNC’s NCAA response. (SportsChannel 8)

Chansky’s Notebook: Did The NCAA Bury Evidence?

Despite the fact that the NCAA enforcement staff had previously agreed UNC’s outside counsel could access all materials relevant to the investigation via a secure website, this information was not included, contrary to the requirements of NCAA Bylaw 19.5.9. They were discovered by the university only because its representatives traveled to the national office to review the physical files personally. (Chapelboro.com)

Bethel: A (Counter) Q&A on the UNC Scandal

Following UNC’s response to the NCAA’s amended notice of allegations this week, I believe now is an appropriate time to clarify the issues further for those still trying to discern fact from fiction. Rather than develop my own set of questions for a Q&A, I’ve decided to counter N&O reporter Dan Kane’s Q&A from earlier this year. (Unverified, the Film)

UNC following strategy originated by Tarkanian vs. NCAA

Much has changed in the decades since former UNLV basketball coach Jerry Tarkanian filed a celebrated law suit challenging the extent of the NCAA’s authority over a college’s internal operations, but it’s interesting that UNC is following a similar strategy – one that led to a landmark ruling in favor of the NCAA. (WRAL Sports Fan)

UNC Response Challenges NCAA Missteps

The NCAA enforcement process operates under different guidelines than the U.S. legal system, although both methods require a strict adherence to the rules. UNC detailed its meticulous approach in applying the NCAA’s constitution and bylaws in its Amended Notice of Allegations response, while also highlighting the enforcement staff’s procedural errors. (Inside Carolina)

Reactions to the UNC’s NOA Response

UNC’s NOA response to the NCAA was released yesterday. Based on several valid arguments, UNC shrugged off many of the charges, much to the dismay of some. Or the delight, depending on your perspective. So how did everyone react to the document? Well… (SportsChannel 8)

UNC finally goes on defense against NCAA

Part of the penalty already paid by UNC was six years of largely inaccurate media coverage, which the university’s athletics programs, especially the football and men’s basketball teams, have weathered remarkably well. But that coverage established a false narrative that continues to this day — and is why those paying attention part-time expect UNC to get the electric chair. (The Robesonian)

UNC didn't cheat 'the system'

If the responsibility lies within the university as opposed to the athletic department, then what is the NCAA even doing here? It’s an athletic, not an academic, association. Granted, they do determine eligibility benchmarks, but in terms of how schools educate their students (and this is the issue here), that’s the grayest of possible areas for the NCAA. (WRAL Sports Fan)

North Carolina's tough D in infractions case another hint NCAA penalties may be soft

When the amended NOA was released in April and every reference to the men’s basketball program had been removed from the initial notice, it seemed as though this process would meander quietly to a demure conclusion. Nope. Whether it was the collapse of the punishment against Penn State football or the unique nature of its own case, UNC is behaving boldly. (Sporting News)

UNC response a stroke of genius...as long as the NCAA buys it

The Tar Heels are acknowledging that they got caught red-handed going 95 in a 35 MPH zone while pointing out to the cop that clocked them that he doesn’t have the jurisdiction to issue a ticket because the stop took place a few feet over the county line. It’s a unique strategy that could turn out to be a stroke of genius if the NCAA buys it. (Wilmington Star News)

UNC AD Bubba Cunningham -- Key quotes

North Carolina responded to the NCAA's Amended Notice of Allegations on Tuesday afternoon. In the response the University disagree with many of the NCAA's charges including the allegation that UNC had demonstrated an institution lack of control. UNC Athletic Director Bubba Cunningham addressed and took questions from the media in a teleconference on Tuesday. (Carolina Blue)

UNC skips self-imposed penalties in response to NCAA charges

UNC is challenging the NCAA's jurisdiction to pursue charges in the school's long-running academic fraud scandal and is holding off on self-imposed penalties. The school on Tuesday publicly released its response to five potentially top-level NCAA charges, but it argued that its accreditation agency — not the NCAA — was the proper authority to handle such a matter. (Associated Press)

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