Tar Heel Times
Your comprehensive source for Tar Heel sports news

UNC Campus Connections

Complete coverage of North Carolina Campus Connections.

Climbing the bell tower with the Class of 2018

During Senior Week every year, members of UNC's senior class hike up the 128 steps inside the bell tower to sign their name on bricks inside. The UNC General Alumni Association has been hosting the event since 2003. “It’s so beautiful and it’s so sentimental,” said senior Stevie Coleman. “Taking it all in and really just getting to enjoy Carolina’s campus one last time.” (UNC.edu)

From E-Haus to SNL, UNC graduate Lindsay Shookus reflects on career

Flashback about 20 years: Lindsay Shookus was a freshman living in Ehringhaus Residence Hall, the president of her sorority and studying public relations in the School of Media and Journalism. Now, she is a two-time Emmy award winner for her work on SNL and has producing credits on 45 episodes of the show “30 Rock.” Shookus was destined for greatness. (Daily Tar Heel)

Carl Kasell, NPR broadcaster and co-founder of WUNC, dies at 84

Every weekday for more than three decades, his baritone steadied our mornings. Even in moments of chaos and crisis, Carl Kasell brought unflappable authority to the news. Kasell died Tuesday from complications from Alzheimer's disease in Potomac, Md. He was 84. At UNC, Kasell was, unsurprisingly, one of the first students to work at its brand-new station, WUNC. (NPR.org)

Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower's master bell ringers

People on campus hear the Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower’s chimes each day, but two UNC students listen with particular interest.Chris Pirrung and Katie Rose Hand are the tower’s master bell ringers, a position that dates back to the bell tower’s construction in 1931. Their responsibilities include ringing the bells on football game days and other special occasions. (UNC.edu)

Local Lore: The Bunker Beneath UNC

Oddly enough, one particularly large and significant shelter could be found at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Relatively far away from Washington DC, the shelter on the UNC campus was meant for one purpose: to protect a computer. The UNIVAC 1105 in the basement of Phillips Hall, one of the three ever manufactured, was installed in 1959. (Chapelboro.com)

UNC goes to Washington: Graduates reflect on their paths to politics

When U.S. Rep. David Price, D-N.C., graduated from UNC in 1961, the idea of running for Congress was far from his mind. He didn’t know it at the time, but multiple aspects of his campus involvement would later play an important role in his political career. “(Congress) was never on my radar screen,” he said. “But I was interested in leadership." (Daily Tar Heel)

Accelerating autism research at UNC

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has long been one of the world’s premier autism research universities, taking on the disorder from every angle — genetics, developmental, biomedical and cognitive. Currently, nearly 100 faculty members, students and postdoctoral researchers from 32 departments within five schools work on autism-related research. (UNC.edu)

UNC junior named Carolina’s sixth Beinecke Scholar

Jordan Jenkins, a third-year student at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, was recently selected for the prestigious Beinecke Scholarship. Jenkins, who is pursuing majors in history and political science, hopes to earn a doctorate of philosophy in United States history, focusing on race and class in the American South. (UNC.edu)

UNC among top-rated public colleges in new rankings

The University of North Carolina is among the nation’s top 100 public colleges, as rated by Business First. Current rank (among 485 public colleges): 2. The annual rankings are based on a 22-part formula that analyzes the latest data from the National Center for Education Statistics and the U.S. Census Bureau. (Triangle Business Journal)

Carolina dreams even bigger on the second Arts Everywhere Day

On the second Arts Everywhere Day, UNC again moved arts from beyond the stage and into the quad, but this time the University stretched the arts further — reaching where more students live on south campus. The installations, live performances and other events on Friday might have been temporary, but soon the arts will have a new, permanent footprint. (UNC.edu)

20 years after ‘Cold Mountain,’ award-winning author and UNC grad Charles Frazier is hot again

Charles Frazier’s first novel, “Cold Mountain,” was a massive bestseller about the Civil War and a critical success. It won a 1997 National Book Award and was adapted for an Academy Award-winning film. In the 20 years since that spectacular debut, Frazier has published sparingly. But now, with his superb new novel, “Varina,” he has circled back to the Civil War. (Washington Post)

UNC student selected as James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program recipient

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill senior Frances Reuland has been selected for the elite James C. Gaither Junior Fellows Program run by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She is UNC-Chapel Hill’s second recipient of this one-year award. The Junior Fellows Program provides substantive work experience at the Carnegie Endowment. (UNC.edu)

Martin Luther King, Jr. Speaks at UNC in 1960

Today marks 50 years since the death of Martin Luther King Jr. In honor of the late civil rights leader, we reflect on the time that King spoke at the University of North Carolina in 1960. Invited to the University by campus religious organizations and the Carolina Forum, King's visit occurred just as the fight for equality began gaining momentum in the community. (UNC.edu)

April 1968: Carolina Reacts to the Assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

When Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968 – 50 years ago today – the reactions of UNC students were emblematic of the complex racial landscape at UNC. In a timeline of events on campus in the week following the assassination, alumnus John Sellars remembered the reaction on campus when students learned of King’s assassination. (UNC.edu)

Revisit late novelist and UNC grad John Ehle, who founded some of NC's most innovative schools

What if you turned over the keys to state government to an innovative novelist/intellectual and told him he had a year to come up with some original ideas for the state? That is what Gov. Terry Sanford did in 1962, when he hired John Ehle as his special assistant and idea man. The result was a burst of creative energy that North Carolina state government had not seen before. (Raleigh News & Observer)

Next >


© 2005-2018 Tar Heel Times | Contact | Privacy Policy | Site Map | RSS | Did UNC Win?

Tar Heel Times is an unofficial resource for UNC fans and is not affiliated with the University of North Carolina.